Anjali Purohit is working to combine ancient techniques with modern designs to create Variously, a brand of sustainably designed and produced scarves, bags and home goods. Her experience with retail brands like Anthropology, J.Crew and Free People have inspired Anjali to create a brand centered around responsible supply chain management.  

Modern Artisansal Textile developed using Shibori technique and organic indigo dyes.

Modern Artisansal Textile developed using Shibori technique and organic indigo dyes.


On the Phone with Anjali Purohit

J'adore: Tell me everything I need to know about Variously.

Anjali: "Variously is going to be contemporary fashion and home accessories- I'm starting off with scarves,  and then taking it to bags and home goods. The company is based on combining visual culture experiences as a designer. I'm attempting to create a brand founded on design and meaningful supply chain. Variously is a contemporary label, we focus on prints and weaving techniques and sustainable design methods by reusing waste materials, using organic yarns, hand looms, and natural textiles like cotton and cashmere. Everything is naturally dyed.

I'm working with an organization that teaches women how to be highly skilled craftsmen. They practice skill sharing which adds to the quality of the product. Women empowerment is important to our supply chain process. Differently-abled artisans are trained by an organization."

 

J'adore: How did you link up with the organization?

Anjali: "I’ve done a lot of work for J Crew, Anthropology, Target, and Free People - I’ve come across these organizations working on several design projects. My past experience has helped me to understand good relationships. I love the idea of combining contemporary inspirations with heritage techniques."

 

J'adore: Will you be doing commissioned work

Anjali: Right now I’m looking at a few options, I’m looking for buyers and looking to seek out collaboration. I want to combine my work with designs from Detroit’s unique artists."

 

J'adore: How long have you been in Detroit?

Anjali: "Nine years, I got married and moved here with my husband." 

 

J'adore: What got you started in the textile industry?

Anjali: "I went to National Institute of Fashion Technology, New Delhi. It's India's number 1 ranking fashion school for Bachelors in Accessory Design and Nuovo Accademia Di Belle Arti ( NABA ) in Milan for Masters in Showroom Design. Both are among top 100 fashion & design schools known internationally.

 

J'adore: Where are some of your favorite places to visit?

Anjali: "Berlin! There’s an amazing mix of modern design and art and everything technology. New York City is always inspiring and there’s a lot to love about Detroit. In India, I love the diversity of the country."

 

J'adore: What designers do you draw inspiration from?

Anjali: "There’s a new line of Scandinavian designers, they’re very successful in keeping Scandinavian heritage intact but making adaptable accessories. I’m always looking at what they’re working on, and how they are pricing their products because it’s affordable without compromising their products.

Mary Katrantzou, is a greek fashion designer who lives in London. Her work is amazing, she uses a mix of prints and materials."

 

J'adore: Where can we find your products?

Anjali: "Variously is just starting out, right now I’m testing the market and looking for artists to collaborate with. I’m working on creating an online store. New prints and weaves are in development. I’m in the middle of the conception stage and in the process of getting in touch with buyers."


Being close to the source . Waste coffee beans are used as an ingredient to dye textiles.

Being close to the source . Waste coffee beans are used as an ingredient to dye textiles.


If you are an artist interested in collaborating with Anjali, contact her through Variously's website. It would be so cool to see a line of scarves featuring one of the city's signature graffiti tags. 

-Samantha Robinson 

Comment